Archives for December 2016

Mendocino County man and his mother have been fined for the failure of a giant water bladder that ruptured

A Mendocino County man and his mother have been fined $37,079 for the failure of a giant water bladder that ruptured, spilling up to 80,000 gallons and carrying sediment down a tributary to the Eel River in April 2013. The Press Democrat reports the deluge of water tore out vegetation, dislodged boulders and scoured the seasonal stream bed before flowing into the Eel River, muddying its waters, according to the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board, which announced the penalty last week.

Ukiah Valley Fire Authority responds to single car accident

The Ukiah Valley Fire Authority reports two people were transported to the hospital Thursday morning after their car struck a power pole in front of the Ukiah airport. According to UVFA Capt. John Strangio, a man was driving southbound on South State Street on his way to work around 6:30 a.m. Dec. 29 when he reported falling asleep. Strangio said all four occupants of the vehicle, which included two adults and two kids, had exited the vehicle by the time fire crews arrived. He said the two adults were transported to Ukiah Valley Medical Center as a precautionary measure by MedStar ambulance, and the two kids were released to other family members.

Friends of Middletown Library group is extending its fundraising effort

The Friends of Middletown Library group is extending its fundraising effort to replace thousands of dollars’ worth of children’s books lost in the Valley fire last year. Jacquie Bogue, the group’s treasurer, said the fundraiser is part of the south county’s ongoing rebuilding effort. he said they are attempting to raise $10,000, with the Friends to match up to $4,500 in donations. While the library itself had only minor roof damage in the fire, many books had been checked out to children across the south county were destroyed when homes burned, according to Bogue.

Media-oriented manual snow survey of Water Year 2017 at 11 a.m. on Jan. 3

The California Department of Water Resources will conduct its first media-oriented manual snow survey of Water Year 2017 at 11 a.m. on Jan. 3 at Phillips Station, just off Highway 50 near Sierra-at-Tahoe Road approximately 90 miles east of Sacramento. Electronic readings of the Sierra Nevada mountain snowpack on Tuesday peg its statewide water content at 10.5 inches, 72 percent of the December 27 average. The Phillips snow course, which has been measured each winter since 1941, is one of dozens that will be traversed during a 10-day period around Jan. 1 to determine the water content of the snowpack, which normally contributes about 30 percent of California’s water when it melts.

Redwood Community Services looks to purchase property for homeless

The organization hoping to build small living spaces in Ukiah for homeless residents has set its sights on buying the property currently being used for an emergency winter shelter. The Ukiah Daily Journal reports Camille Schrader, the chief financial officer for Redwood Community Services, told the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors earlier this month that the $1.17 million property at 1045 S. State St. was identified as nearly the only option after a long and difficult search prompted by the sale of the previously selected site on Brush Street.

Lake County Grand Jury has issued a roundup of local officials’ responses

The Lake County Grand Jury has issued a roundup of local officials’ responses to the recommendations issued in this year’s grand jury report. The report was released in July, with local officials required by state law to respond within 90 days, making the responses due by Sept. 30. Later in the fall, the grand jury issued a followup, shown below, that brings the recommendations and responses together. Rosemary Dontje, the foreperson for the grand jury through June 2017, said the idea for issuing a followup that gives the community an update on how local officials responded to the report came from the California Grand Jurors’ Association.

Marijuana use has risen among teenagers since it was legalized in Colorado and Washington

A new study conducted by UC Davis has found that marijuana use has risen among teenagers since it was legalized in Colorado and Washington as the stigma of smoking has declined. Magdalena Cerdá, an epidemiologist with the UCD Violence Prevention Research Program and first author of the study, stated while legalization for recreational purposes is currently limited to adults, potential impacts on adolescent marijuana use are of particular concern.

Earthquakes shake parts of California and Nevada

There was some movin’ and shakin’ in California and Nevada early Wednesday morning as a series of moderate-sized earthquakes and powerful aftershocks hit near the California-Nevada border. The United States Geological Survey reported that the series of quakes started at approximately 12:18 a.m. Wednesday with a 5.7-magnitude quake near Hawthorne, Nev., which was followed four minutes later by another quake of the same magnitude a short distance away.

Willits Bypass hurting businesses along the route

Some businesses may be thinking, “bye, bye…bypass”…In the wake of the Willits Bypass opening about a month and a half ago, some local property owners are expressing concerns about what they say is a surprising and sudden drop in sales and foot traffic into their shops. One food shop owner is attributing a permanent closure to a fatal reduction in business as a result of what he perceived to be inadequate signs along U.S. Highway 101.

Frank Howard Memorial Hospital’s makeover is complete

Frank Howard Memorial Hospital’s makeover is complete, with a flood of new equipment capable of offering patients better, faster care. Improvements include new hospital beds, portable X-ray machines, 3D mammography and more. Willits News is reporting that Cici Winiger, community outreach and communications manager, hopes all the new equipment will attract more doctors to the hospital. She said recruiting doctors has always been an issue at Howard Memorial because of location and lack of housing, as well as the county’s reputation as a marijuana mecca.